bits and pieces

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Kimchi Perogies


Right around the time this photo was taken I realized something: perogies =
dumplings. FUSION power!
Perogies? Yes please. Korean perogies? Say, what now?  Yes. Korean perogies.

So. Now that my younger brother has moved to Regina, he is a weekly guest at our house to watch Game of Thrones.  He is working as a roofer and as such he is often dirty and always hungry. I normally end up making perogies - which I buy in giant frozen bags from the store and pan fry with butter and caramelized onions.

I have a life long love of perogies which dates back to my younger and funner years in Montreal. Our token 3 AM food was perogies which I made best. Or at least I'll claim I made best. No one's here to stop me. I've only made my own perogies from scratch once as it took about 3.5 hours and a lot of arm strength as we did not have a pasta machine to roll out the dough. This was not fun and made me generally glad that I wasn't an 18th century Ukrainian lady.

I've read dozens of times how perogies are super easy to make if you use wonton wrappers as the dough. I never have and I don't know why. This was easy to remedy with the purchase of wonton wrappers. Now making perogies is a sane enough venture, but why oh why would I stuff them with kimchi? Well, earlier this month I was supposed to have blogged a fusion dish for a twitter-blogger group I joined. I got completely overwhelmed and didn't. I had been thinking a lot about fusion though, and had been wanting to make my own kimchi for awhile. Ergo, kimchi perogies.

Now neither of these are authentic recipes (obviously. who puts kimchi in perogies?). Real kimchi recipes require days of fermentation which I wasn't interested in, and real perogies are obviously made in dough - not wontons. That said these were oddly delicious. Part of the appeal is that while they have a catchy fusion name and backstory, they are (as noted in my photo caption) in fact dumplings. And kimchi dumplings sound pretty darn good.

kimchi ingredients:
1.5 cups of coleslaw mix (I didn't feel like shredding cabbages so I bought the bag at the grocery store. Sue me)
2 tbsp of kosher salt
1/8 cup of rice wine vinegar
1 tsp chili powder
1 tsp white sugar
1 clove of garlic, minced
1/2 inch piece of ginger, minced
3-4 dashes of fish sauce

perogie ingredients:
wonton wrappers
small dish of water
2 tbsp of oil

other things you will need:
frying pan with a lid
2-3 hours
1 bowl
an empty soup can/cookie cutter/ring thing for cutting circles into your wontons

  1. Start your kimchi. In a bowl combine your salt and your coleslaw. Cover and set aside for two hours.
  2.  After two hours, squeeze out all the excess water from your coleslaw.  Mix in all of your other ingredients, cover and set aside for an hour or two.
  3. Once your kimchi is ready - grab a stack of wonton wrappers. Using your cookie cutter/soup can if you're ghetto fabulous like me, cut a circle shape into your wonton wrappers. Set the excess aside.
  4. Place 1.5 tsp (roughly a pinch) of kimchi in each wrapper. Wet the edge of the wonton and press to close making a little half-moon perogie shape. Repeat until you've had enough.
  5. In a frying pan heat your oil over medium and add your perogies. Brown lightly on both sides. Add 1 tbsp of water to your frying pan, cover, and let them steam for a minute or two. Remove from heat.
  6. In the frying pan heat a little more oil and add your left over wonton wrapper fragments. Toast up until they're crunchy. Top your perogies with a pinch of kimchi, some diced cucumber (if you want) and the crispy wonton chips. Serve with peanut drizzle and enjoy!




2 comments:

  1. shitty because as original as this comes off, No. 7 in Brooklyn's been there done that.

    ReplyDelete
  2. oh well, never been! Apparently it's actually a very well known dish in Korea called kimchi mandu so it's not that original at all - just new and original for me.

    ReplyDelete